Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency

#AI has surpassed us already and made us its slaves.

I was thinking about the recent news of renowned scientists and experts warning us against Artificial Intelligence that could surpass us. Unfortunately, I think this happened already without us knowing it, and, what most, it has made us its slaves (or we’ve inadvertently submitted ourselves to it).

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#StartWithWhy: for processes too?

May 17th, 2016 Posted in Change Tags: , , , , ,

In the same vein as the preceding article, and because I’m definitely a How guy, I thought that Simon Sinek’s concept could as well be used when considering the creation of value.

  • the Why is the purpose of a process or an activity. It’s both the origin of it (what you come from: a problem to be solved) and the end of it (what the customer wants),
  • the How is the process itself which turns the initial problem into value for the customer,
  • and the What is value that gets created along the process.

All three aspects of value creation are necessary for it to be effective. The Why is necessary for the process to exist in the first place. The How is useful to maximize the throughput and make the most use of the energy to create the value. Leftover energy can be used for other value creation activities. And the What is the result of the process, flowing to the customer, which will pay you for that so you can live from what you do and hopefully what you love to do (the Why, that is).

Makes sense?

 

#StartWithWhy: Why, How, What: are we all wired the same?

May 17th, 2016 Posted in Change Tags: , , , , ,

I love Simon Sinek’s video about his theory of “Start with Why“. And I have no doubt it works.

But once you’ve sold your why-idea to someone, what happens next? I was asking myself this question when thinking about change (in general, not only in organizational context).

I suspect one could sort people out in three categories:

  • Why people are those motivated primarily about the purpose or the cause of an action or a change. They’re advocates or public relations people. They find their motivation in trying to make other people see and understand their perspective, or adhere to the same “why”.
  • How people are motivated by the process or method by which to reach the Why. If the Why triggers them into motion, the How is what drives their relentless actions: How to communicate? How to best serve the cause?
  • What people are finally those who are motivated by the doing. They want to get things done, because, in the end, it’s all that count.

If the selling of an idea “starts with why”, the realization of it clearly needs all three types.

You might know the parable of the man throwing back fishes stranded on the beach. He picks them up one after another and throws them back into the sea. Yet there are thousands left to go. Comes a passerby wondering whether this makes any difference given the huge number to go proceed, some of which will probably die anyway. The guy answers, throwing another fish in the sea: “to this one at least, it does make a difference!”.

The guy throwing fishes back into the sea is a What person. A How person would take some time devising a method to throw more back to the sea at a time and a way to preserve the ones left to throw until their time has come. And finally a Why person would beat drums to gather other people to help in throwing fishes back into the sea.

I’m clearly of the How type. What about you?

Pick a project you’re working on. Who’s in charge of the Why and is it articulated clearly enough? Have you thought of the How in order to best deliver your value or message? And who’s in charge of the doing?

Les pratiques managériales les plus innovantes du monde – JDN

Liste de pratiques innovantes en matière d’organisations. Assez complet, avec des exemples et des critères de succès. Un article comme on aimerait en voir d’autres…

Audace, inventivité, souplesse, authenticité… Tout le monde s’accorde à dire que nos entreprises doivent se réinventer pour se différencier. Quand on parle d’innovation, on pense stratégie, offre, organisation et très rarement management, à savoir la manière dont on anime et les Hommes. Pourquoi ?

Source: Les pratiques managériales les plus innovantes du monde – JDN

Synthèse des définitions de la #permaculture

Je ne peux ne pas citer ce site que je viens de découvrir avec cette excellente vision systémique (!) de la permaculture comme approche de changement de la société. Lisez toute la page ci-dessous !

Synthèse des définitions de la permaculture | Permaculture sans frontières – Reforestation sans frontières

Cultiver des hommes… #Lean #Permaculture #Agroécologie

M’intéressant actuellement à la permaculture (cf. ce post de janvier), je viens de réaliser un certain nombre de parallèles :

  • Le Lean dit (en japonais): “mono zukuri wa hito zukuri” soit “fabriquer des choses, c’est fabriquer des hommes”. Donc il faut fabriquer des hommes avant de pouvoir fabriquer des choses, et le Lean est un business model qui vise à développer les hommes par la résolution de problèmes
  • L’agroécologie (l’un des aspects de la permaculture), c’est faire de l’agriculture qui régénère les sols plutôt que les épuiser
  • le 8e gaspillage du Lean est souvent cité comme étant la créativité inexploitée des collaborateurs.

Je trouve le parallèle saisissant si l’on considère que les pratiques managériales actuelles tendent à désengager et déresponsabiliser les collaborateurs, ce qui les amènent à ne plus contributer d’idées et d’innovation à l’amélioration de leurs entreprises. Comme si les pratiques managériales (agricoles) avaient épuisé les sols (collaborateurs), et qu’il faille pallier avec force consultants, méthodes, et autre command & control.

Re-apprenons à travailler avec la diversité (des idées), réinvestissons une partie des gains de l’entreprise vers les collaborateurs (compostage sur place !), travaillons avec les bordures (valoriser le différent, les frontières de l’entreprise), recherchons les interactions entre plantes (collaborateurs d’expertises différentes) et nous aurons un terreau (une culture organisationnelle) à nouveau propice au développement d’idées !

Arrêtons de planter des graines qui donnent des plantes stériles [hybrides F1] (idées extérieure, gestion du changement command & control), mais valorisons les graines anciennes (idées des collaborateurs, adaptées au terrain/terreau de l’entreprise) qui poussent sans intrants chimiques (méthodes importées de l’extérieur et tuant toute créativité en interne) !

Faisons de l’agroécologie ou de la permaculture d’entreprise !

 

Transformational Change vs. Continuous Improvement (#Lean #change)

March 21st, 2016 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , , ,

Great article taking a different approach to what’s most often done in organization. Lean is a whole system thing. You cannot nit pick tools out of it, you have to gobble the whole thing and change everything, becasue everything in Lean works and touches every other thing in the organization.

It may sound like sacrilege to hear someone say that continuous improvement may not always be the right answer. Of course, it is the core process of lean management. But, there are times when more significant and more rapid change is required – sometimes revolution rather than evolution is called for.

Source: Transformational Change vs. Continuous Improvement

Internet has been ubered. Or more precisely LaZooz’d: Meet the men who have rewritten the internet – IT Analysis from V3.co.uk

March 18th, 2016 Posted in Internet Tags: , , ,

Ok, that’s official, the web has been uber’ed: no more central web servers to connect to, only a P2P network of pieces (secured) that you query to get your data back. Of course it existed already for storage, not the thing has been made more widely available for all to use and develop onto.

Source: Meet the men who have rewritten the internet – IT Analysis from V3.co.uk

Reblog: Reimagining Money by @rushkoff

March 9th, 2016 Posted in Change, Economy Tags: , , , , , , , ,

by Douglas Rushkoff, author of Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity (excerpted in…

Source: Reimagining Money — Medium

This is indeed a great article which explains rather simply the possibilities of alternative currencies.

When Henri Ford told that:

It is well enough that people of the nation do not understand our banking and monetary system, for if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning.
and after reading some stuff from Bernard Lietaer, I just can’t see how I could continue like that. Of course, I can’t afford (!) to make a revolution on my own. But I can surely investigate how to change the economic landscape around me. A bit.

Reblog: An Industrial-Age Solution To Email Overload | @FastCompany

February 9th, 2016 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , , ,

This is a very interesting article indeed. Now, that’s not as if Lean or Agile practitioners wouldn’t shield workers and developers from incessant perturbations. We know that already, albeit we’re only practicing it for certain categories of workers (line workers or developers for instance), and not for the rest of the organization.

When you’re going for optimization, do it to the whole value chain, not just where value is added. And while you’re at it, remove that which doesn’t bring value at all. Hint: there’s a hell lot of stuff that might qualify as “work” but which is not adding value to your customers. It’s most probably bugging your employees and destroying their engagement.

A century ago, the Pullman Company came up with an ingenious solution to help brass workers do their jobs without distraction.

Source: An Industrial-Age Solution To Email Overload | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

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