Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
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Moving Motivators Free Exercise » NOOP.NL @jurgenappelo

November 20th, 2013 Posted in Change, Strength Tags: , , , , , ,

Here’s a nice exercise to check how a change initiative will affect people motivation factors.

I see this as useful in the context of any project (to check and possibly amend before rolling it out), in HR to exchange with people about what motivates them and where they would be more happy & efficient (what opportunities would allow them to raise their motivation factors?). The possibilities are endless!

Moving Motivators Free Exercise » NOOP.NL.

#Video about the future of #Lean: #Strength Based Lean by @DavidShaked1

David Shaked (@DavidShaked1) as authored a video promoting his book “Strength-Based Lean Six Sigma“. If you want to know more about what this beast is about, check it out below!

Also, you’re warmly invited to contribute to the LinkedIn group on the same subject!

 

Here are my @LeanIT2013 slides about #Lean and #ITIL

November 5th, 2013 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , ,

My slides have been put online by the Lean IT Summit team:

You can also see them at their web site, with others from all the exceptional speakers (there are some videos there too).

Overall, it was an exceptional moment with great speakers!

 

Reblog: #Kanban and #Lean – a challenging association (from @djaa_dja)

October 28th, 2013 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , , ,

David J Anderson posted a very nice piece some months ago about the relation current “Lean Kanban” and Lean initiatives have in common (or lack thereof for some part of it).

Indeed, the reasons advanced by David are the same that launched me on a journey to find some new ways to make Lean sticks once the coach turns away from a team (as if often requested from an internal Lean Coach, which is my situation). More precisely, this might be why the best approach to Lean teaching might be to work with a Lean sensei (as advocated by, for instance, Michael Ballé [web]).

Although I totally agree with David’s reasons for being wary of the way most consulting companies introduce Lean, I would not throw the baby with the bath water. There are some people who try to promote a respectful deployment of Lean (as if “respect for people” should have gone away from Lean!). The original “Boston Lean” authors as mentioned by David are just the first of them, despite the fac that their work has too often been misunderstood and the focus on tools be the norm. Granted, at the time the initial Lean books were written, Toyota Production System knowledge outside Toyota was mostly focused on the visible parts, namely the tools. Yet the respect part of it was already there. Michael Ballé’s two (Shingo) prized books (“The Gold Mine” and “The Lean Manager“) also feature the people aspects intertwined with the tools.

Lastly, Michael’s latest book in french have a whole part dedicated to that respect for people and how Lean is supposed to turn the gemba into a thrivable environment (“Le Management Lean” with Godefroy Beauvallet).

So, should we be wary of “Boston Lean“? Definitely when it means focusing on “toolbox Lean”! But I’m not sure that creating a side track with Lean Kanban is also the thing to do, despite helping in the short-term.

A reinforcement of the respect for people part of Lean, what it can bring in the short, middle and long-term to the organization’s betterment is, to me, the definitive path to look after. It’s the duty of Lean coaches to prove that we can achieve safety, quality, delays and cost improvements all the while making employees thrive at work. Indeed, this is the only thing that works on the long-term.

 

Reblog @HarvardBiz : Can You Invent Something New If Your Words Are Old?

A nice post that makes you think: Can You Invent Something New If Your Words Are Old?

Lean is deficit-based in its language: what problem do we need to fix? What failure demand do we need to take care of? What’s the gap between where you are now (bad) and where you want to be (customer need)?

Hopefully, I see the glimpse of positive change here and there:

  • Lean Startup is gaining a lot of traction when it comes to doing just what the customer want but with a constant thrust to find more and more added value, even in the form customer didn’t know they had a need for. Lean startup is also starting to be use elsewhere, like in Lean Change for instance by Jason Little.
  • Strength-Based Lean Six Sigma by David Shaked which specifically addresses this (disclaimer: I reviewed the book). The book is due on November 4th.
  • And of course the usual positive suspects (deficit word, again!): Appreciative Inquiry, Solution Focus, Positive Deviance, and much more.

In my book (“The Colors of Change“), I make the case for strength-based change approaches and explain why we don’t use them naturally (why it’s normal to fail), what can we do instead, and list some of the change approaches that I feel are strength-based and make use of a different language to achieve different (and better!) results.

Using a different language, we can co-construct a different reality, and, experimenting it, we can confirm and reinforce our thinking that this indeed works better. It’s usually better because of the absence of so-called “resistance to change”, learning step, etc.

Don’t try to match reality to your dreams (it will just reinforce the gap).

Don’t try to force your dreams onto reality (you’ll find resistance).

Instead, do search for your dreams in reality. I bet you’ll find them!

#Bravo pour le #livre “Le #management #Lean” de @thegembacoach et @godefroy_b!

Je viens de finir “Le Management Lean” de Michaël Ballé et Godefroy Beauvallet (http://www.amazon.fr/Le-Management-lean-Michael-Ball%C3%A9/dp/2744065528 #reader_2744065528)

Michaël Ballé est un coach Lean (français) reconnu internationalement, auteur de 2 autres livres primés par le Shingo Prize (“The Gold Mine” et “The Lean Manager”).

Ce livre est tout simplement exceptionnel. C’est un “manuel de Lean management” simple et surtout, il explique très très clairement dans sa dernière partie l’importance du respect des gens et notamment des employés.

Extraits:

Selon cet idéal [de l'entreprise Lean], l’entreprise est créée par des êtres humains pour satisfaire des besoins humains et est composée d’être humains. [...]

Le “respect pour l’humanité” est au coeur de la performance et la clé du juste-à-temps. [...]

Respecter ses employés est lié à la conviction que chacun est capable de progresser et à l’effort du management de tenir compte des aspirations du personnel qu’il emploie.[...]

Cette réalité humaine est une richesse pour l’entreprise, et non une complexité inutile.[...]

Le respect des employés n’est pas un supplément d’âme pour pays nantis, c’est la voie de nouvelles relations sociales, dans une certaine mesure plus tolérantes et apaisées, assurant que chacun puisse donner le meilleur de lui-même.[...]

Les clients, employés et partenaires sont des personnes et non des ressources, des rôles ou des fonctions.[...]

Une performance intrinsèquement collective dépasse de loin les résultats obtenus avec une logique mécaniste de l’action, qui sépare “les têtes qui pensent et les bras qui font” et invente des règles à n’en plus finir et des incitations en tranches de plus en plus fines.

Je m’arrête là, ce livre regorge de pépites du même genre dans sa 3e partie (et les 2 premières sont limpides sur la manière de réaliser l’idéal du Lean Management, en tout respect des collaborateurs, afin de libérer leur engagement (cf. rapport Gallup sur les résultats catastrophiques de l’engagement au travail, notamment en France)

Une dernière pour la route:

Dans les termes employés par des managers d’entreprises dirigées dans un esprit véritablement lean, ils ont l’occasion de “s’éclater au travail”. Le travail ne devrait pas être un lieu de souffrance, mais un espace de réalisation.

Ma conclusion : fuyons le déploiement tayloriste des outils du Lean, et revenons à ce qu’il devrait être réellement : un outil de libération de la motivation intrinsèque et de l’engagement des collaborateurs et des managers. Alors la performance client et financière suivra.

Pas l’inverse.

Produire Le #bonheur au #travail #crowdfunding : participation!

October 14th, 2013 Posted in Change Tags: , , , , ,

Il est proposé aux internautes de participer au financement d’un film sur le bonheur du travail: Produire Le bonheur au travail.

Le Lean permet cela (quand il est bien fait, mais c’est parfois à se demander si c’est encore possible…), d’autres approches aussi (cf. vidéo de pitch à l’adresse précédente).

Check it out!

 

Reblog: The Big Blindspot of Every Culture-Maker: How to Go From “Outsider” to “Insider” « Get Storied #storytelling

October 14th, 2013 Posted in Change, The Colors of Change Tags: , , , ,

Funnily, I wanted to write my own Hero’s (internal) journey, and this is prcisely when I am stuck now. Hopefully, what I’ve been seeking (and found) was precisely how to do that connection with people that were lost before.

The key to my return is precisely what I have found (that weren’t really lost anyway, just hidden in plain sight).

The Big Blindspot of Every Culture-Maker: How to Go From “Outsider” to “Insider” « Get Storied: Change Your Story. Change Your World.

Read the post above, then you might want to check what I’m talking about: The Colors of Change, my currently-being-written book.

#Lean Analytics is the missing piece of #leanstartup : learn with @acroll in Paris #prodmgmt

October 14th, 2013 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , ,

A crowdfundingly organized event is planned to have Alistair Croll deliver a workshop on Lean Analytics in december in Paris, France: Lean Analytics Masterclass.

I probably won’t be able to make it, but I can only highly suggest that you give it a head in order either to experiment with Lean Startup with your own ideas or (and?!) experiment with the Lean Startup concepts with what you’re trying to achieve at work. Even if your work isn’t explicitely related to Lean!

Using crowdfunding to testbed whether people are interested in the even or not is very Lean Startup in spirit as well. I love the organizing idea!

 

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